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9 Tourist Attractions in Aachen, Germany

Sonali Pimpale Aug 8, 2019
Germany’s westernmost city, Aachen sits on the borders near the Netherlands and Belgium. Famed for its rejuvenating hot springs, the city was the favored royal residence of the Frankish King Charlemagne.

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Aachen Cathedral

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Constructed under the edict of Charlemagne in the 8th century, the palatial cathedral is the first UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. Its highlights include the king's Palatine Chapel and his imperial throne.

Aachen Cathedral Treasury

Situated on the cathedral grounds, the treasury hosts many relics from medieval Christian artworks, including a striking bust of King Charlemagne and the Cross of Lothair.

Aachen Town Hall

Built on the site of the former palace of Charlemagne, the imposing building is famous for the opulent Coronation Hall and spectacular frescoes by Alfred Rethel.

Couven-Museum

Hosted in an elegant 17th century house, the museum displays historical furniture and décor from Rococo, early classicism, Napoleonic empire and Biedermeier styles.

Ponttor

A shining example of medieval architecture, Ponttor is one of the two remaining old gates of the original city wall. Back in the time, the imposing gate was manned by soldiers and militia.

Centre Charlemagne

Housed in an ultra-modern glass building, this museum explores the rich history of Aachen, with special focus on the part played by Charlemagne into the development of the city.

Elisenbrunnen

Spas and baths are an integral part of the city’s traditions, right from the Roman times. The gorgeous pavilion, with two outstanding sulfurous fountains, is considered to be the symbol of Aachen.

International Newspaper Museum

Located in the Aachen market place, the museum holds a vast collection of over 200,000 newspapers from across the globe, including some first editions.

Suermondt-Ludwig-Museum

Located in the stately Villa Cassalette, the museum is renowned for its collection of medieval German sculptures and artworks, including works from masters like Anthony van Dyck and Max Beckmann.