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Interesting Facts About the Historically Significant City of Quebec

Interesting Facts about Quebec City
In addition to being the capital of one of the most historically significant areas of Canada, Quebec City, in itself, is simply amazing. Here are some interesting facts about this great Canadian city.
Vacayholics Staff
Last Updated: Dec 09, 2017
Did You Know?
The oldest educational institution for women in North America, the Ursulines of Quebec, is located in Quebec City at 12 Donnacona Rue.
Quebec City is the capital of the Canadian province of Quebec. It is the oldest city of the country, and was discovered on July 3, 1608 by Samuel de Champlain, a French explorer. He named this place Quebec from the Algonquian word Kébec, which means 'The river narrows here'.

Before Champlain laid his eyes on Quebec, another French explorer had already tried establishing a French base here. His name was Jacques Cartier, and he landed in Quebec in 1534. He also found that the first significant inhabitants of this region were a bunch of 'Iroquois' who lived in a village called 'Stadacona'. However, Cartier couldn't extend his stay because of the harsh weather conditions. Quebec City was important to France, and hence, was the site of many memorable conflicts during the Anglo-French war.
The city of Quebec has served as a capital on several occasions, and hence, has the term 'National Capital' synonymous with it. It served as the capital of French Canada from 1608 to 1627, and was the capital of New France from 1632 to 1763. From 1763 to 1791, it was the capital of the Province of Quebec, and then was regarded as the capital of Lower Canada from 1791 to 1841. After that, it was made the capital of the Province of Canada from 1852 to 1856, and from 1859 to 1866. Since 1867, Quebec City has been named the capital of the province of Quebec. Let's check out some more interesting things about Quebec City.
Quebec City Skyline at Night
Quebec City Skyline at Night
Amazing Facts about Quebec City
Quebec new city
Quebec new city
Quebec old city
Quebec old city
► The city of Quebec is divided into two sections: Upper and Lower. The lower section, also called 'Old Quebec', has still maintained its vintage aura with narrow, crooked streets and old English architecture. The upper section is a high-tech city with great roads, industries, young crowds, and beautiful residential buildings.
► Even though Canada remains a bilingual country, majority of the people in Quebec City speak French. English is spoken by limited people; hence, tourists are advised to be fluent in at least basic French. 90% of the people here are Roman Catholics. The city has been divided into six boroughs that contain thirty-five districts, and is also home to 37 National Canadian Historic Sites.
Fortified walls around Quebec city
Fortified walls around Quebec city
Chateau Frontenac hotel
Château Frontenac hotel
► The highest point of the city is the crest of Cape Diamond (Cap-Diamant). It stands 333 feet above the St. Lawrence river, and houses a strong natural fortress called the Citadelle of Quebec. Since colonial times, there were all kinds of fortifications built around the city by the British and the French, and hence Quebec City is now the only fortified town in North America.
► One of the most beautiful buildings in this city is the Château Frontenac. Also termed as the most photographed hotel in the world, the present construction sits on the site of the Château Haldimand, an older castle built in the 18th century to serve as the official residence of the colonial government.
Plains of Abraham
Plains of Abraham
Parliament building of Quebec
Parliament building of Quebec
► Other famous historically significant tourist sites include the Plains of Abraham. This is where the British defeated the French under the leadership of Gen. James Peter Wolfe, in 1759. At present, the location is an extremely popular picnic site among locals and tourists.
► Designed by Eugène-Étienne Taché, and built from 1877 to 1886, the Parliament building is an impressive structure, consisting of four wings that form a square of about 100 meters. It currently houses the Parliament of Quebec. Twenty-four bronze statues of some of the most important figures in the history of Quebec can also be seen in the building.
Quebec bridge
Quebec bridge
Montmorency falls
Montmorency falls
► The city is also home to the longest cantilevered bridge span (549 meters) in the world. Known as the Quebec Bridge, it has three vehicle lanes, one rail lane, and a pedestrian walkway. The bridge is also famous across the country because of the two collapses that occurred during its construction.
► At 84 meters high, and 46 meters wide, the Montmorency Falls, located between the town of Beauport and Boischatel, is 30 meters higher than Niagara Falls. These falls were named by Champlain in honor of Henri II de Montmorency, the viceroy of New France from 1620 to 1625. There is also a hydroelectric station at the falls which generates electricity for the surrounding areas.
Quebec winter carnival
Quebec winter carnival
Quebec province map
Quebec province map
► The city of Quebec is also home to the Quebec Winter Carnival (the world's largest winter carnival), Hôtel de Glace (the only ice hotel in the entire North America), and the Village Vacances Valcartier (the most popular water theme park in the country).
► The province of Quebec is also home to a group of people called the Separatists. Their main motto is to separate Quebec from Canada, as they believe that the region's rich and fascinating history separates it from the rest of the country. In fact, their dream almost came true in 1995, when Quebec was about to separate from Canada through a vote that was 49.5% in the favor of separation with 50.5% against it.
Quebec is one of the few great cities that perfectly balances its old and new architecture. A rare combination that has preserved its history, and at the same time, also encouraged modernization.