Surprising Facts About the Liberty Bell: A True American Treasure

Liberty Bell Facts
A very important monument in American history, publicized in the movie, 'National Treasure', the Liberty Bell is very dear to all Americans. It is considered as a symbol of freedom; and thousands of people take a trip to Philadelphia to see this true American treasure.
In 1701, William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania, issued the 'Charter of Privileges'. Historians believe that the bell was ordered to commemorate the freedom he secured for the natives of Pennsylvania. The bell was rung on July 8, 1776, to summon the citizens of Philadelphia to the first public hearing of the 'Declaration of Independence', which was read out by Colonel John Nixon. The Liberty Bell was given an iconic status in 1837, when the 'bell' was adopted as the symbol of abolition of slavery in the United States of America. Abraham Lincoln, who was the sixteenth president of the US, abolished slavery at the end of the American Civil War.
Did you know?

Taco Bell, a fast food chain once announced in The Philadelphia Inquirer, New York Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Dallas Morning News, and USA Today that it was buying the Liberty Bell - this was just a joke, as the article was published on the 1st of April, 1996.
The Liberty Bell i
☞The Liberty Bell is one of the monuments identified with the American Revolution.
☞This bell is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The complete address is Liberty Bell Center, Market Street between 5th & 6th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1752, the Liberty Bell was originally cast in Whitechapel Bell Foundry. Since a crack had developed, it was recast in 1753 at Pass & Stow, Philadelphia.
Height, Weight and Composition
☞The original bell weighed over 2,000 pounds, and the yoke of the Liberty Bell weighed around 100 pounds.
☞The height of the bell from the lip to the crown measures 3 feet.
☞The circumference of the bell approximately 12 feet. 70% copper and 25% tin, along with metals such as zinc, arsenic, silver, and gold, were used to make the Liberty Bell.
☞The wood used for the yoke is made of American elm, which is also known as slippery elm. In 1752, the cost of the original Liberty Bell was $225.50.
The Crack
The Crack of the Liberty Bell
☞The bell has a visible crack that measures approximately 24.5 inches long and about 1.5 inches wide, which was last measured in 1993 by the park curator Bob Giannini. The reason for the crack is still a mystery. The crack occurred when the bell was struck for the first time. Some historians speculate that the crack became deeper every time the bell was rung.
☞The bell was struck for 90 years after it was cast.
First and Last Ringing
☞The bell was tolled for special occasions after it was mounted in 1754.
☞It was rung for the last time on the birthday celebrations of George Washington, on the 23rd of February, 1846.
Tales of Travel
☞The bell was brought back to Philadelphia after being toured throughout the nation.
☞From 1753 to 1976, the Liberty Bell was housed in the Independence Hall.
☞From 1976 to 2003, it was hung in the Liberty Bell Pavilion. On October 9, 2003, it was hung in the new Liberty Bell Center.
☞The bell is now owned by the City of Philadelphia, and not the Park Service who were the previous owners.
Miscellaneous Facts
☞The Liberty Bell still remains the symbol of freedom. In 1915, a replica was used to promote suffrage of American women.
☞The clapper of the bell was chained to its side.
☞The strike note of the bell is 'E Flat'.
☞Millions of tourists from all over the world visit the Liberty Bell Center every year.
☞ In 1976, visitor records were broken, when 3.2 million people visited the bell.
☞ The bell is visible to viewers 24 hours a day from the streets.
☞ The visitation timings are daily 9 am to 5 pm, with extended hours during the months of July and August.
☞ In 1876, when the Centennial was celebrated in the United States of America, the replica of the bell presented by Pennsylvania State was made out of sugar.
☞ The Liberty Bell is a must-see artifact when you visit Philadelphia. The location and history of the bell makes it a popular tourist attraction.
Liberty Bell Center
Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania isolated